Elinor Drinkwater Woodhouse, 18611926 (aged 65 years)

WOODHOUSE - Elinor Drinkwater
Name
Elinor Drinkwater /Woodhouse/
Given names
Elinor Drinkwater
Surname
Woodhouse
Birth June 4, 1861
British Queen
Victoria
from June 20, 1837 to January 22, 1901 (aged 39 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Henry John Temple
from June 12, 1859 to October 29, 1865 (aged 4 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
John Russell
from October 29, 1865 to June 28, 1866 (aged 5 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Edward Smith-Stanley
from June 28, 1866 to February 27, 1868 (aged 6 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Benjamin Disraeli
from February 27, 1868 to December 3, 1868 (aged 7 years)

Census April 2, 1871 (aged 9 years)
Address: Bronte House Everton Liverpool Lancashire
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
William Ewart Gladstone
from December 3, 1868 to February 20, 1874 (aged 12 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Benjamin Disraeli
from February 20, 1874 to April 23, 1880 (aged 18 years)

Census April 3, 1881 (aged 19 years)
Address: Burghill Court Burghill Herefordshire
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
from April 23, 1880 to February 1, 1886 (aged 24 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
William Ewart Gladstone
from February 1, 1886 to July 25, 1886 (aged 25 years)

Census April 5, 1891 (aged 29 years)
Address: Burghill Court Burghill Herefordshire
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
from July 25, 1886 to August 15, 1892 (aged 31 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
William Ewart Gladstone
from August 15, 1892 to March 5, 1894 (aged 32 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Archibald Primrose
from March 5, 1894 to June 25, 1895 (aged 34 years)

Census March 31, 1901 (aged 39 years)
Address: Burghill Court Burghill Herefordshire

1901 UK Census transcript - Elinor Leece Drinkwater - Household RG13 Piece: 2479 Folio: 35 Page: 1 Burghill Court, Burghill, Hereford

Name Relation MC Age Sex Occupation Employ WH Birthplace Infirm
Elinor Leece Woodhouse Head W 71 F Living on own means - West Derby, Liverpool
Elinor Drinkwater Woodhouse Daughter S 39 F - - West Derby, Liverpool
Martha Gordon Woodhouse Daughter S 32 F - - West Derby, Liverpool

Notes: add 1 visitor and 6 servants

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Robert Gascoyne-Cecil
from June 25, 1895 to July 12, 1902 (aged 41 years)

The Boer War
Battle for control of southern Africa
from October 11, 1899 to May 31, 1902 (aged 40 years)

British King
Edward VII
from January 22, 1901 to May 6, 1910 (aged 48 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Arthur Balfour
from July 12, 1902 to December 5, 1905 (aged 44 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Henry Campbell-Bannerman
from December 5, 1905 to April 5, 1908 (aged 46 years)

Olympic Games
Games of the IV Olympiad
from April 27, 1908 to October 31, 1908 (aged 47 years)
Census April 2, 1911 (aged 49 years)
Address: Burghill Court Burghill Herefordshire

1911 UK Census transcript - Elinor Leece Drinkwater - Household RG14PN15690 RG78PN956 RD337 SD3 ED3 SN31 The Court Burghill Near Hereford

Name Relation MC Age Sex YrsM ChB ChL ChD Occupation Industry Employ WH Birthplace Infirm
Elinor Leece Woodhouse Head W 81 F 50 3 3 - Private means West Derby, Liverpool
Elinor Drinkwater Woodhouse Daughter S 49 F - - - - Private means West Derby, Liverpool
Martha Gordon Woodhouse Daughter S 42 F - - - - Private means West Derby, Liverpool
Alice Woodhouse Niece Visitor S 58 F - - - - Private means Cheshire, Frodsham

Notes: and 5 servants

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Herbert Henry Asquith
from April 5, 1908 to December 6, 1916 (aged 55 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
David Lloyd George
from December 6, 1916 to October 23, 1922 (aged 61 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Bonar Law
from October 23, 1922 to May 22, 1923 (aged 61 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Stanley Baldwin
from May 22, 1923 to January 22, 1924 (aged 62 years)

Residence September 8, 1926 (aged 65 years)
Address: Burghill Court Burghill Herefordshire
Unmaried September 8, 1926 (aged 65 years)

British King
George V
from May 6, 1910 to January 20, 1936 (aged 74 years)

The Great War from July 28, 1914 to November 11, 1918 (aged 57 years)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Ramsey MacDonald
from January 22, 1924 to June 7, 1935 (aged 74 years)

Death September 8, 1926 (aged 65 years)
Cause of death: Murdered with her sister Martha by their butler.
Media object
CensusView

1901 UK Census transcript - Elinor Leece Drinkwater - Household RG13 Piece: 2479 Folio: 35 Page: 1 Burghill Court, Burghill, Hereford

Name Relation MC Age Sex Occupation Employ WH Birthplace Infirm
Elinor Leece Woodhouse Head W 71 F Living on own means - West Derby, Liverpool
Elinor Drinkwater Woodhouse Daughter S 39 F - - West Derby, Liverpool
Martha Gordon Woodhouse Daughter S 32 F - - West Derby, Liverpool

Notes: add 1 visitor and 6 servants

CensusView

1911 UK Census transcript - Elinor Leece Drinkwater - Household RG14PN15690 RG78PN956 RD337 SD3 ED3 SN31 The Court Burghill Near Hereford

Name Relation MC Age Sex YrsM ChB ChL ChD Occupation Industry Employ WH Birthplace Infirm
Elinor Leece Woodhouse Head W 81 F 50 3 3 - Private means West Derby, Liverpool
Elinor Drinkwater Woodhouse Daughter S 49 F - - - - Private means West Derby, Liverpool
Martha Gordon Woodhouse Daughter S 42 F - - - - Private means West Derby, Liverpool
Alice Woodhouse Niece Visitor S 58 F - - - - Private means Cheshire, Frodsham

Notes: and 5 servants

Shared note

Crime and Punishment

Execution of Charles Houghton - 1926

H.M. PRISON GLOUCESTER FRIDAY 3rd DECEMBER 1926

CHARLES HOUGHTON AGED 45 YEARS

The extreme penalty of the law was carried out in HM Prison, Gloucester on Friday morning when Charles Houghton was executed following the judgement of Mr Justice Swift at Hereford Assizes for the murders on September 7th of two elderly ladies, theMisses Elinor Drinkwater Woodhouse and Martha Gordon Woodhouse by whom he was employed at Burghill Court near Hereford.

The crime which Houghton has expiated on the scaffold was a terrible one. Houghton had been in the services of the Woodhouse family for 22 years, first as a footman, then as a butler. In the summer of 1926 he became intemperate in his habits and asa consequence on September 6th he was interviewed by the two ladies and given a notice of dismissal. He was asked to leave within 24 hours and given a months wages. He protested against the shortness of the notice and was told he could remain untilthe end of the week.

Houghton seemed to feel his condition keenly but he attended family prayers the next morning and served breakfast. A little later two reports of a gun were heard in the kitchen and Miss Elinor Woodhouse was found lying in a passage just outside thekitchen door and Miss Martha Woodhouse further along the passage. When the police got Houghton out of his room he had seven wounds, evidently caused by a razor, in his throat.

Since the passing of the capital sentence on November 5th, the condemned man has been in the cell set apart for condemned prisoners in HM Prison, Gloucester. The actual date of the execution was postponed pending an appeal against the sentence, butthis was subsequently withdrawn. His solicitors from Hereford who had been entrusted with the defence, placed further evidence as to Houghtons state of mind before the Home Secretary and it was hoped as a result that a reprieve would save the prisoner from the scaffold.

The Home Secretary however regretted that he was unable to interfere with the sentence.

Shortly before eight oclock on Friday morning, the folding doors separating the condemned cell from the execution chamber were opened and Houghton had but a few steps to take on to the spot from where he met his death. The arrangements for the execution had been made by the County Under Sheriff of Herefordshire in conjunction with Mr Harry Whyte, Prison Governor.

The executioner was Pierrepoint with an assistant who had not been named, (who is required by the Home Office to be competent to act in the case of an emergency).

At eight oclock on Thursday evening, as required by the regulations, twelve hours before the execution, an Official notice was posted announcing the hour at which the execution would take place.

On Friday morning shortly after 7.30, the bell of St Mary-de-Lode commenced to toll and the officials arrived at the main gate. Just before eight, the tolling of the bell was at longer intervals and at eight oclock it ceased.

The little gathering outside the prison did not number more than 25 at any time, and there was nothing to interest them until about 8.15 when two Warders appeared and posted the two Notices proclaiming the sentence had been carried out. It is understood the execution was carried out with great expedition. Immediately afterwards there was a general exodus of Warders going to breakfast.

The Coroners inquest was conducted in the Committee of Visitors Rooms at 10.30 on Friday morning and the Jury were told they had been called together to do their duty in respect of the offender Charles Houghton who had been indicted tried and convicted of murder, then sentenced to death. the law provided that the judgement of death should be carried into execution in the prison in which the offender was detained. The responsibility of the Jury was to identify the offender, that he was the person sentenced to death and the sentence had been carried into effect.

The various officials gave their evidence, testifying that all the stipulated requirements had been met in full. The coroner thanked all present for their diligence and formally closed the inquest.

The closing scene of the tragedy was the burial of the corpse which took place in the space reserved for such offenders against the north wall of the prison.

Excerpts from the Gloucester Journal 1926